Question Solved1 Answer identify the sedimentary rocks provided 3. Identify the sedimentary rocks provided. Number Texture Minerals Present Reaction to Hydrochloric Acid Sedimentary Rock Name 18 19 20 27 22 Instructions for Filling in the Sedimentary Rock Identification Table Column 1: Texture If grains are visible in the sample, tell whether they are gravel, sand, silt, or clay sized. You can use a ruler or grain size comparator to determine the grain size. If grains are not visible (for example in chemical, biochemical, or organic sedimentary rocks), write "grains not visible", or put a dash (-) in the texture column. Column 2: Minerals Present Use your 10x hand lens or a dissecting microscope to carefully examine and identify the minerals in the rock. The most common minerals in sedimentary rocks include calcite, dolomite, gypsum, halite, quartz, feldspar, clay minerals and iron-bearing minerals. If the sample is coal, it will not have any minerals, so put a dash (--) in the mineral column. Column 3: Reaction to Hydrochloric Acid Use hydrochloric acid (HCI) to test the sample to determine whether calcite or dolomite is present. Calcite fizzes readily in acid. Dolomite fizzes only if scratched or powdered. Test the rock with 1 drop of dilute HCl and examine it to see whether it reacts and effervesces (or fizzes), producing bubbles of carbon dioxide gas. If it fizzes, write yes. If it does not fizz, write no. If it fizzes only when scratched and powdered, using a nail or dissecting needle, write only if scratched. Blot up all acid drops immediately with a paper towel. Column 4: Sedimentary Rock Name Use Chart 2.5, along with the photos and descriptions of the other sedimentary rocks, to identify the specimens provided. TABLE 2.5 SILICATE MINERALS Pamela Gore Pamela Gore Quartz is commonly white, pink, brown, gray, or colorless. Feldspar has two directions of cleavage at 90 degrees. Pamela Gore Pamela Gore Muscovite mica splits into flat, transparent sheets. Biotite mica is black or brown and splits into flat sheets I Pamela Gore Pamela Gore Pamela Gore Pamela Gore Muscovite mica splits into flat, transparent sheets. Biotite mica is black or brown and splits into flat sheets. Pamela Gore Pamela Gore Pyroxene has two directions of cleavage at 90 degrees. (Scale in centimeters.) Amphibole has two directions of cleavage not at 90 degrees.

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identify the sedimentary rocks provided

Transcribed Image Text: 3. Identify the sedimentary rocks provided. Number Texture Minerals Present Reaction to Hydrochloric Acid Sedimentary Rock Name 18 19 20 27 22 Instructions for Filling in the Sedimentary Rock Identification Table Column 1: Texture If grains are visible in the sample, tell whether they are gravel, sand, silt, or clay sized. You can use a ruler or grain size comparator to determine the grain size. If grains are not visible (for example in chemical, biochemical, or organic sedimentary rocks), write "grains not visible", or put a dash (-) in the texture column. Column 2: Minerals Present Use your 10x hand lens or a dissecting microscope to carefully examine and identify the minerals in the rock. The most common minerals in sedimentary rocks include calcite, dolomite, gypsum, halite, quartz, feldspar, clay minerals and iron-bearing minerals. If the sample is coal, it will not have any minerals, so put a dash (--) in the mineral column. Column 3: Reaction to Hydrochloric Acid Use hydrochloric acid (HCI) to test the sample to determine whether calcite or dolomite is present. Calcite fizzes readily in acid. Dolomite fizzes only if scratched or powdered. Test the rock with 1 drop of dilute HCl and examine it to see whether it reacts and effervesces (or fizzes), producing bubbles of carbon dioxide gas. If it fizzes, write yes. If it does not fizz, write no. If it fizzes only when scratched and powdered, using a nail or dissecting needle, write only if scratched. Blot up all acid drops immediately with a paper towel. Column 4: Sedimentary Rock Name Use Chart 2.5, along with the photos and descriptions of the other sedimentary rocks, to identify the specimens provided. TABLE 2.5 SILICATE MINERALS Pamela Gore Pamela Gore Quartz is commonly white, pink, brown, gray, or colorless. Feldspar has two directions of cleavage at 90 degrees. Pamela Gore Pamela Gore Muscovite mica splits into flat, transparent sheets. Biotite mica is black or brown and splits into flat sheets I Pamela Gore Pamela Gore Pamela Gore Pamela Gore Muscovite mica splits into flat, transparent sheets. Biotite mica is black or brown and splits into flat sheets. Pamela Gore Pamela Gore Pyroxene has two directions of cleavage at 90 degrees. (Scale in centimeters.) Amphibole has two directions of cleavage not at 90 degrees.
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Transcribed Image Text: 3. Identify the sedimentary rocks provided. Number Texture Minerals Present Reaction to Hydrochloric Acid Sedimentary Rock Name 18 19 20 27 22 Instructions for Filling in the Sedimentary Rock Identification Table Column 1: Texture If grains are visible in the sample, tell whether they are gravel, sand, silt, or clay sized. You can use a ruler or grain size comparator to determine the grain size. If grains are not visible (for example in chemical, biochemical, or organic sedimentary rocks), write "grains not visible", or put a dash (-) in the texture column. Column 2: Minerals Present Use your 10x hand lens or a dissecting microscope to carefully examine and identify the minerals in the rock. The most common minerals in sedimentary rocks include calcite, dolomite, gypsum, halite, quartz, feldspar, clay minerals and iron-bearing minerals. If the sample is coal, it will not have any minerals, so put a dash (--) in the mineral column. Column 3: Reaction to Hydrochloric Acid Use hydrochloric acid (HCI) to test the sample to determine whether calcite or dolomite is present. Calcite fizzes readily in acid. Dolomite fizzes only if scratched or powdered. Test the rock with 1 drop of dilute HCl and examine it to see whether it reacts and effervesces (or fizzes), producing bubbles of carbon dioxide gas. If it fizzes, write yes. If it does not fizz, write no. If it fizzes only when scratched and powdered, using a nail or dissecting needle, write only if scratched. Blot up all acid drops immediately with a paper towel. Column 4: Sedimentary Rock Name Use Chart 2.5, along with the photos and descriptions of the other sedimentary rocks, to identify the specimens provided. TABLE 2.5 SILICATE MINERALS Pamela Gore Pamela Gore Quartz is commonly white, pink, brown, gray, or colorless. Feldspar has two directions of cleavage at 90 degrees. Pamela Gore Pamela Gore Muscovite mica splits into flat, transparent sheets. Biotite mica is black or brown and splits into flat sheets I Pamela Gore Pamela Gore Pamela Gore Pamela Gore Muscovite mica splits into flat, transparent sheets. Biotite mica is black or brown and splits into flat sheets. Pamela Gore Pamela Gore Pyroxene has two directions of cleavage at 90 degrees. (Scale in centimeters.) Amphibole has two directions of cleavage not at 90 degrees.
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Photo 1. The above rock is Breccia. It is a clastic sedimentary rock.  It contains angular fragments of gravel and sand. It does not react with HCl.    Photo 2. The given rock is organic sedimentary rock . It is composed of marine organisms shells. It  reacts with HCl. The name of rock is Coquina (organic  limestone) Photo 3. The name o ... See the full answer